Posts tagged strength
pushing the upper limit

I don't believe that motivation or passion is finite. I do not believe either commodity is like a gallon of milk and that one morning you have none left for your Lucky Charms cereal (not that I have had that experience or anything).

I think we burn out, or perhaps a better way to describe it is to say, we need to recharge. We need to recharge, regularly. Far more than we actually do. But our capabilities for motivation and passion are far from finite. They are only deepened by our ability to push the limit. Growth comes from extending ourselves until we think we can no longer extend. To push our motivation and our passion beyond where we thought our breaking point was. Every day our bodies must rest and perhaps every so often our motivation and passion must also bed down for the night. We must rest in order to perform at our highest capability.

But here's the thing that gets to me - as a leader - how does one know when too much is truly too much? How do we push the upper limit of motivation and passion, then encourage rest without stepping on or stifling growth in others and ourselves? Where is the line? How do we prompt those around us to recognize the capability and progress further and stronger, but maintain themselves - to not lose every bit of who we are without saving just a bit for ourselves?

 

golden gloves

Sometimes you don't realize how hard you are fighting,

Until you stop.

Until you stop and

Rest your arms.

 

Ease the bobbing and weaving

Against the invisible enemy and

Slow your heart just enough to realize

That what you are fighting

Is no longer present.

That you conquered that enemy

Long, long ago.

Gone.

 

And somehow,

After the vanquish,

You forgot to hang up

The Golden Gloves. 

 

locard's principle, revisited

Dr. Edmond Locardwas a pioneer in forensic science. He formulated this most basic principle of forensic science (and of life): "Every contact leaves a trace". Every television show, movie and book about crime scene investigation relies (heavily, in fact) on this principle. A criminal simultaneously takes a piece of the crime scene and leaves a piece of himself during the act as any part-time devotee of Law and Order or CSI knows.

And so it is with all of human interaction.

We are touched, often deeply, by the humans we acquire during a lifetime. I say acquire, because sometimes their arrival is arbitrary and sometimes it is quite deliberate. Our network, neighborhood, family, peeps or just plain friends, teach us, train us and often lead us. 

Many times we are better for it. Sometimes not so much. Leaving a bit behind and taking a bit with us can be painful. Or even perhaps pleasurable when we recognize how much we helped someone grow.

Over the past few months, I've noticed (deeply so) that a few of my deepest relationships have left more than just a trace in my life. And I in their's. And likewise, I have taken, sometimes liberally, from those who have become a part of my scene.

I hope that never changes.